Archive for April, 2019

Christians in the Arena

Monday, April 29th, 2019

Christians worldwide reacted in horror to the news of the bombing of Sri Lankan churches on Easter Sunday. More than 250 persons were killed and hundreds more were maimed or injured.

A prominent Wall Street Journal columnist, Gerald Baker, chided the Anglican Archbishop of York for not being more forthright in his expression of solidarity with the Sri Lankan Christians. Baker was concerned that Archbishop John Sentamu emphasized that he was against all forms of anti-religious violence. For Baker, this seemed to undermine the support the Archbishop should have expressed for the recently martyred.

This is a very tricky issue. Christians are “people of the Book ” but so are Jews and Muslims Especially given the secularization of Western culture, we Christians shouldn’t find ourselves blaming all Muslims for the crimes of a few. Faithful people have to stick together.

Nevertheless, the tragedy of Easter Sunday was all Christian. May the Sri Lankans be uplifted by the prayers and witness of all their fellow Christians–and by observant Muslims as well. —J. Douglas Ousley


Our Lady of Paris

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2019

When I served as canon pastor of the American Cathedral in Paris, I was invited to worship on several memorable occasions at what will now be known as the “old” Notre Dame Cathedral.

One evening, I was included in a group of French priests who had gathered to hear Pope John Paul II. On two occasions, I participated in joint Anglican-Roman Catholic baptisms of the children of French-American couples. The baptisms took place at the high altar; I’ll never forget the extraordinary view looking outwards down the length of the immense cathedral.

The French Roman Catholic Church of that era was particularly welcoming to Anglicans. If you were in France and there was no Anglican chapel near by, you could receive communion in the local Catholic church. The same “eucharistic courtesy” was extended to French Catholics visiting England.

Parisian Catholics are now extending openness is to all the people of France, and the French are responding in kind–and with amazing financial generosity. Let us hope that the spiritual generosity also abides, especially between French Catholics and Anglicans. —J. Douglas Ousley


The Great Fifty Days

Monday, April 15th, 2019

The Church season provides for 50 days of celebration of the feast of Christ’s Resurrection from the dead–known as “the Great Fifty Days.”

Unfortunately, the Easter flowers don’t last that long, and people begin to head for the parks or the country on Sundays, and Easter is soon forgotten. Ironically, the 40 days of Lent seem more likely to be observed faithfully!

And yet the tradition is a good one. We need to be reminded that Christ always gives us new life, and we need that reminder as much as we need to acknowledge our sins during Lent.

We have no trouble remembering to celebrate Christmas time. Let’s celebrate Easter time as well. —J. Douglas Ousley


Sinking or Swimming

Monday, April 8th, 2019

At his meeting with our Vestry yesterday, the Bishop of New York was asked what his personal priorities were in his work in the diocese. He replied that he was particularly concerned about churches that were in serious decline.

Bishop Andrew Dietsche told a hopeful story of a parish upstate that was down to 12 members and weren’t able to support a full-time rector. He warned the remaining parishioners that they were at the point where they could either sink or swim. They decided to swim.

That meant that each of the members gave sacrificially of their time and money. They found a new part-time rector, and following a fortuitous influx of weekend residents from Manhattan, the church now has a full-time rector and plenty of members.

Most Episcopal parishes need to make this choice at one time or another. May we resolve to swim! —J. Douglas Ousley


Miserable Offenders

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019

Lent has 16 more days to run and, as usual, I find this penitential season to be a worse experience than I expected it to be. I always feel the same. I just can’t wait for Easter.

I suppose that’s the way penitential seasons are supposed to go; otherwise, they wouldn’t be penitential. They wouldn’t make us feel sorry for our manifold sins and offenses and negligences. Or, as the old Prayer Book put it, we wouldn’t feel like the “miserable offenders” we are.

Of course, that’s not all we are, thank God. We are saved by the Cross of Christ. Baptized in Christ, we are marked as Christ’s own forever.

With that promise in store, perhaps I am kvetching just a little too much about Lent. —J. Douglas Ousley